Worst Dressed Wednesdays

Yellow is my favourite colour and it is an excellent colour to draw the eye or highlight a focal point. So it’s no wonder that this little Terrace House in inner Sydney caught my eye.

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Yellow is the colour of Energy and Life and people that use yellow usually have a preference for sunshine. Maybe these homeowners were tired of being in the shadow of the Plane Tree.

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Yellow has usually been seen in the kitchen or in children’s playrooms. I think this is a bit bright for the exterior of a house. What do you think?

Worst Dressed Wednesdays

DSC01330 Aussie, Aussie, Aussie.

Australian Rowing Team in Beijing

Australian Rowing Team in Beijing

Since 1984, our national colours have been green and gold and our athletes wear these colours proudly. The colours were taken from our national floral emblem, the wattle.

Golden Wattle

Golden Wattle

The colours also represent our landscape, the gold images of our beautiful beaches, mineral wealth, grain harvests and the fleece of Australian wool. Green represents the forests, gum trees and pastures of the Australian landscape.

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Shelley Beach, Sydney

So, do you think these homeowners are patriotic?

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Worst Dressed Wednesdays

lemon and blue

Maybe the owners of this house were inspired by these?

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It was really hard to photograph as I there is no footpath on the opposite side of the road and this house sits higher than the road. Driving past this place really jumps out at you as the houses on either side are so “normal”.

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On closer inspection it looks like there is a lemon tree in the front garden and a grape vine closer to the house. I wonder if that was Wisteria at some stage and therefore inspired the colour scheme?

Worst Dressed Wednesdays

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This property is currently on the market. Maybe they are hoping that the red and green colour scheme will attract a pre-Christmas buyer. That combination always reminds me of Christmas no matter what or where it is placed. I think I’d be calling in the painters if I were to buy it. Oh and a Colour Consultant!

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Worst Dressed Wednesdays

Today we’re looking at house that has been renovated with a second storey extension and a side…..um……box. I’m sure from the inside this addition has given the occupants much needed room but it’s not the prettiest thing from the exterior. And what makes it unattractive is not so much the choice of colour but rather the colour placement.

I’m only guessing, but originally the house would’ve looked alot like this one. Many houses in metropolitan Sydney suburbs that were established around the 1920’s looked like this – a Californian Bungalow. They were often made with this dark brown red brick. These houses traditionally would have been 2/3 bedroom, one bathroom, a lounge, dining room and kitchen. Naturally today they are being extended and that usually means upwards. The interiors are being reconfigured to accommodate larger families and our desire for indoor/outdoor living. Originally double brick, it is a costly exercise to keep the extensions in the same materials so often the upper story is Blueboard and painted or the whole house is painted so the extensions aren’t quite so obvious.

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Extended Californian Bungalow fully painted

However this house has made the extensions stand out. The upper storey is only really visible from the back and as the house is on a corner allotment, that means everyone who passes sees the back as well as the front and the side with the “box”.

The brick box, which may have been there originally, is painted in a dark charcoal grey whilst the extensions are in a light yellowy cream. This dark colour really stands out against the lighter colour and seems to advance rather than recede, which is what I think it should do. We’ve talked before about making items which are not pretty stand out and in this case, I would’ve painted all the extension in the same colour rather than choosing different colours for different parts.

The front doesn’t look too bad except for that grey box on the right and the small window has been picked out in lemon.

The beauty of engaging a professional to assist in choosing colours is not only in selecting which colour and which shade but also where to place the colours. The colour scheme in this case is not the issue, it’s the placement which has spoilt it.

Apologies

I’m so sorry, I don’t have a Worst Dressed Wednesday house for you today. I have been so busy. Not that I haven’t seen any, I just haven’t been able to stop and take a snap as I drive past.

Screaming Yellow via Butt Ugly Houses

Screaming Yellow via Butt Ugly Houses

So I decided to do a Google search and came across this site which I must say, leaves some of my earlier posts for dead. Have a look for yourself.

Worst Dressed Wednesday

On our way back from our day out in Berry last Saturday, we stopped for an icecream at a town called Gerringong. It’s a pretty little town on the coast and the icecream shop was on the ridge. We sat on the grassy bank and licked away taking in the view.

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But this monstrosity blocked it. What were they thinking? I know there is a saying that all blue’s go together but I think I may have found the exception. The roof of the building is Colorbond Deep Ocean and the bricks are a cream colour. A mocha brown has been chosen for the flat board but it’s the turquoise blue on the paneling that just doesn’t work with the rest of the colours.

DSC01234 They would’ve been better to continue with the mocha colour or else match the paint to the Colorbond colour or even use an off white. But this turquoise just doesn’t cut it!

Brick Colour

Brick Colour

Roof Colour

Roof Colour

Paint Colour

Paint Colour

Now substitute

Turquoise

Turquoise

with

Darker Mocha Colour like Dulux Arrow Shaft

Darker Mocha Colour like Dulux Arrow Shaft

or

Off White like Dulux Hog Bristle Half

Off White like Dulux Hog Bristle Half

And the left hand suite is occupied by an Architectural Firm. I hope they’re renting!

Worst Dressed Wednesdays

Cold and uninteresting. Dark and foreboding.  I think that sums up the look of this house from the outside.

The house is set slightly below the road so from the street you can see ALOT of roof. The roof tiles are charcoal and for some unknown reason, the paint colour chosen is barely a shade lighter than the roof tiles. The window frames are also grey but again, not enough variation from the wall colours.

When choosing colours for the exterior of a property, it is imperative that the swatches be viewed out in the open so you can see the full effects of the daylight. There is a large tree shading the front of this south-west facing house. Southerly aspects in Sydney receive no direct sunlight at any time of the day or year and so a lighter shade is usually recommended for rooms or walls facing this way. With the tree also causing shade the colour appears to be much darker than what it probably is.

The introduction of another colour for the front door and garage door is giving some relief but in my mind, it is still not light enough to lift the somber mood the house portrays.

Worst Dressed Wednesdays

We’re back with another property that could look better.

Brown has been around forever. The house I grew up in, in the ’70’s had Mission Brown trim. It was a modern take on a Tudor so it’s understandable.

Our 70's Tudor House - note the orange curtains!

Our 70's Tudor House - note the orange curtains!

The colour was not that popular for a decade or two but after 9/11 we seemed to gravitate back towards this earthy, safe hue.

My mother, an artist, has always had a strong aversion to brown. I think she pictures a dark, muddy colour with no life. However, as we have seen over the past almost 10 years, brown doesn’t have to be lifeless. Think about all those lovely rich Mochas and Lattes that have graced our backs, our houses, our interior walls, our floors, etc. The trick when using brown is to make sure it has a pleasing undertone. It might be purple, or green or red but brown needs something.

Dulux Rocky Road

Dulux Rocky Road

Dulux Port Glow

Dulux Port Glow

Dulux Bunker

Dulux Bunker

The homeowners of this property have used a really bland brown. The house does not have any contrasts either. Without taking my fandeck and trespassing, I can’t be sure but the garage doors, poles and downpipes look like they have been painted in the same colour but perhaps a few shades apart. Whatever they’ve done, it hasn’t enhanced the look at all.

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It would have been much better to make a feature of the poles and take these much darker or much lighter. Architectural features are put there to be a feature so make them stand proud. The downpipes on the other hand should just blend in with the wall on which they sit. Downpipes are NOT features.

DSC01161 What do you think? Does this shade of brown appeal to you?

Worst Dressed Wednesdays

Welcome to another post where we look at a property that has a “different” colour scheme.

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This house has recently been repainted. It is a Sydney red brick Californian Bungalow and therefore there is not a great deal of painted surfaces. The gable, gutters and batons on the gable as well as the window frames and fences are about it. In my opinion the blue is too high chroma (too bright) and too clean to work harmoniously with the red brick.

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Blue is the most popular colour in the universe and represents constancy and truth. If I had been asked to choose a blue for this house I would have knocked it back a bit, greyed it up, taken the red bricks as my lead and chosen a shade that would work with reddy, brown rather than zing away from it.

Something like

Dulux Blue Fin

Dulux Blue Fin

That would give a softer look alongside

Volcanic Brick

and

Dulux White Watsonia

Dulux White Watsonia

This mistake is made often, when combining colours on houses. Take the colour that is predominant and hang everything else off that bearing in mind the chroma level and whether the base colour is a warm or cool colour. Adding a bit of zing is great in clothing, especially beach wear but sometimes on a house it can look so wrong.

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